Writing 65 Research

Evaluate your library session:  follow-up evaluation!

First–it’s a great idea to get to know key service points within the actual library!

Library Reserve and Circulation Desk
Faculty place readings and  course materials  (sometimes including text books) on RESERVE at the library so that students can check them out for short periods of time.  The Library Reserve/Circulation desk is also where you can check out library materials, including laptops, keys to group study rooms, books and more!

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Library Information Desk and 24/7 Librarian Assistance
Need help finding some information?  Are you new to databases and want to find an article?  Do you need help printing a document?  The LIBRARY INFORMATION DESK on the main floor of the library is the place to go when you have a question!

You can also talk with librarians 24/7 via our chat service located on the
Library webpage.

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Campus Library Webpage

Next–you are going to want to get to know the Campus Library Webpage at http://www.cocc.edu/Library so that you can find books, background information and articles!

Why use a library webpage for accessing information when you can just use Google, you ask?

WELL!  Think of the library as your map to the world of information.  You can wander around the free web (Google, etc) and stumble across factual, accurate information just like you can wander around Europe and stumble upon the Eifel tower (eventually!).  There’s a lot of great stuff that can be found by wandering, but if you want efficient, effective access to information, library search tools help you get there fast.

Furthermore, have you ever felt like you needed a credit card available to access the good stuff on the web?  Doesn’t that feel a little stressful?

Libraries buy the good stuff for you.  That’s what we’re all about–giving you access to good, valuable, scholarly information.  The thing is, you have to know how to use library search tools in order to find the good stuff.  It’s not harder than Google–it’s just a little more spread out–you use different library search tools to locate different kinds of information, such as books, articles, and facts.

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To Get Some Background–Use Online Encyclopedia Collections:

First, get to the Barber Library Webpage at:  http://www.cocc.edu/Library/.

Look for the encyclopedias and more icon to access online encyclopedia collections. These resources to explore possible topics or to find out more about one particular topic.

Each online encyclopedia in your results list offers sections /articles (but these are encyclopedia articles, not journal articles) on your topic.

Note that all of these resources allow you to download or e-mail sections/articles to yourself AND most have a citation function that lets you choose a particular citation format (such as APA, MLA, etc.)

Here’s some of our general collections of online encyclopedias:

Credo Reference Online

Gale Reference Online

Oxford Reference Online

If you have a social issues topic you might also want to explore:

CQ Researcher

Opposing Viewpoints

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To Get Some Articles, Use Journal Article Databases:

Remember to start at the Campus Library webpage at: http://www.cocc.edu/Library/.

Look for the Articles and More icon to access journal article databases.  Journal article databases let you search on your topic to locate academic, scholarly articles.  The library purchases these databases for you to search–this is different from searching on Google or other “free web” search engines!

Here’s a few databases (from our list of over 100) that might be especially helpful:

Academic One File
Academic Search Premier
General OneFile
JSTOR
MasterFile Premier

Take a look at the Resources by Subject icon as well–it will list all databases and online encyclopedias for specific subject areas!

TO SEARCH A JOURNAL ARTICLE DATABASE:

Database Search Hints

  • start with keyword searching when available
  • use ” ” for phrases
  • use * to locate endings to words (truncation)
  • use boolean commands (nicotine or smok*) and pregnan*
  • searches can be specific
  • full text articles may be e-mailed, downloaded or printed from the screen–we now have a service that looks for the full text of articles ACROSS multiple databases!

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Dental Infection Control

Evaluate your library session:  follow-up evaluation!


 

Campus Library Webpage

You are going to want to get to know the Campus Library Webpage at http://www.cocc.edu/Library so that you can find books, background information and articles!

Why use a library webpage for accessing information when you can just use Google, you ask?

WELL!  Think of the library as your map to the world of information.  You can wander around the free web (Google, etc) and stumble across factual, accurate information just like you can wander around Europe and stumble upon the Eifel tower (eventually!).  There’s a lot of great stuff that can be found by wandering, but if you want efficient, effective access to information, library search tools help you get there fast.

Furthermore, have you ever felt like you needed a credit card available to access the good stuff on the web?  Doesn’t that feel a little stressful?

Libraries buy the good stuff for you.  That’s what we’re all about–giving you access to good, valuable, scholarly information.  The thing is, you have to know how to use library search tools in order to find the good stuff.  It’s not harder than Google–it’s just a little more spread out–you use different library search tools to locate different kinds of information, such as books, articles, and facts.


To Get Some Background–Use Online Encyclopedia Collections:

First, get to the Barber Library Webpage at:  http://www.cocc.edu/Library/.

Look for the Encyclopedias and More icon or the Resources by Subject icon to access online encyclopedia collections. These resources allow you to explore possible topics or to find out more about one particular topic.

Each online encyclopedia in your results list offers sections /articles (but these are encyclopedia articles, not journal articles) on your topic.

Note that all of these resources allow you to download or e-mail sections/articles to yourself AND most have a citation function that lets you choose a particular citation format (such as APA, MLA, etc.)

NOTE:  You will find many, many online encyclopedias providing information on health topics at our Health Sciences Resources page at:  http://www.cocc.edu/library/health/.


To Get Some Articles, Use Journal Article Databases:

Remember to start at the Campus Library webpage at: http://www.cocc.edu/Library/.

Look for the Articles and More icon to access journal article databases.  Journal article databases let you search on your topic to locate academic, scholarly articles.  The library purchases these databases for you to search–this is different from searching on Google or other “free web” search engines!

Here’s a few databases (from our list of over 100) that might be especially helpful:

Again, our Health Sciences Resources page will lead you directly to resources–including article databases–for your topic.  Some article databases particularly appropriate for this class are:

Associates Programs Source Plus
Health Reference Center Academic
Health Source Consumer Edition
Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition

TO SEARCH A JOURNAL ARTICLE DATABASE:

Database Search Hints

  • start with keyword searching when available.  Keywords are the most important words for a topic.
  • use ” ” for phrases
  • use * to locate endings to words (truncation)
  • use boolean commands (nicotine or smok*) and dental
  • searches can be specific
  • full text articles may be e-mailed, downloaded or printed from the screen–we now have a service that looks for the full text of articles ACROSS multiple databases!

Need more help?  You can  talk with librarians 24/7 via our chat service located on the

Library webpage.

 


Citation Format

Find information about how to create citations for a resource list or bibliography: http://www.cocc.edu/library/citations/.

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BA 223

ASSIGNMENT REVIEW:
Describe your product or service then outline the demographic profile of your customers, the geographic reach of your product or service, and the lifestyle (or psychographics) for your customer.

 


DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE RESOURCES:

“Demographics” includes the gender, age, education level, or physical location of your target audience members.

U.S. Census Bureau
A great and free resource for finding out basic demographic elements about the population.

State and County Quick Facts
QuickFacts includes census based statistics for all states and counties, and for cities and towns with more than 5,000 people.

Fedstats
Provides access to statistics from more than 100 federal agencies.

Statistical Abstract of the United States
A comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States.

Social Explorer
Social Explorer provides access to modern and historical census data and demographic information and allows users to create custom maps and tables with the data.

Small Business Development Center National Clearing House
Many, many links to demographic data, business statistics and industry research.


GEOGRAPHIC PROFILE RESOURCES:

These resources help answer the question–where do you want your customers to come come from or live?

Sperling’s Best Places
Visit Bend Central Oregon Maps
Central Oregon Area Maps
Bend Weekly Maps
Oregon Explorer


PSYCHOGRAPHIC PROFILE RESOURCES:

ESRI Tapestry

Pew Social Trends
Studies behaviors and attitudes of Americans in key realms of their lives, including family, community, health, finance, work and leisure.

Claritas – MyBestSegments
Provides a segmentation system defining every neighborhood in the U.S. by zip code in terms of 66 distinct lifestyle types. Some useful free data; in-depth data requires purchase.

SRDS Local Market Audience Analyst
Barber Library is deciding whether to purchase this online resource.   Use only with Internet Explorer.  Your instructor or librarian will provide access logins and passwords for this resource.  Local Market Audience Analyst (LMAA) provides several tools for learning about your target markets: Market Profile Reports, Lifestyle Analysis Reports, Demographics Reports and PRIZM Reports.


NEWSPAPER/MEDIA RESOURCES

Most of these are subscription resources and require you to login with your last name and COCC student ID #.

Bend Bulletin
The Oregonian
Oregon Newspapers


BUSINESS ARTICLE DATABASES

Article databases can be a good source of information about a particular market or demographic area.  Find Barber Library’s online Business Resources at: http://www.cocc.edu/library/business/

 


 

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Psych 215 Developmental Psychology

Assignment Review:

Read one piece of primary scientific literature and one literature review, both on the same topic.  Write an APA formatted paper about the topic.


Article Definitions:

Primary Scientific Literature–
(from Univ. of Wisconsin Libraries)

Primary scientific literature has several characteristics:

1. They often have a “Materials and Methods” section and “Results” section.

2. Authors may use “We” or “I” to describe what was done.  There are often multiple articles.

3. They are usually very specific: mentioning particular places, organisms, etc.

4. Papers usually start with an introduction– an overview to set the stage for the research. A very explicit description of what was done follows: the materials or methods used and/or the exact location and sampling procedures.

Literature Review–
(from UC Berkeley Libraries)

What is a literature review?

Literature reviews (also called review articles) survey and synthesize primary research on a particular topic.

  • They are articles authored by researchers and published in scholarly journals
  • They summarize multiple primary research articles
  • They are secondary literature

Why are literature reviews a good starting point for researching a topic?

  • They provide an overview of a particular area of study
  • Their extensive reference lists may be used to locate further relevant articles
  • They may provide ideas for narrowing a too-broad topic

How can I tell if an article is a literature review?

Usually the abstract or introduction to a literature review will state the authors’ intention to survey or analyze the literature on a particular topic. Literature reviews usually have extensive bibliographies, with perhaps 50 – 200 sources cited. Literature reviews usually do NOT present data or other very specific results of research.


 

Psychology Databases:

First, let’s use some search tools that are specifically for research in psychology.

 

Click on the “Articles & More” icon on the Library website’s home page…

library-icon-articles

and then scroll down the alphabetical list until you see “Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection” and “PsycINFO.” These are two search tools that are – as their names suggest – specifically for searching academic literature in the psychology fields.   You can access these search tools off-campus by entering your last name and COCC ID#.


psychdatabases

 

 


Searching Psych Databases:

On to searching…starting with PsycINFO!

PsycINFO

PsycINFO lets you search over 3 million citations for scholarly journal articles, book chapters, books, and dissertations in the field of psychology. The interface will look similar to Academic Search Premier. Take a look:

PsychInfo

Some key search points for this topic:

  • Use “ “ around the phrase “heart rate”.
  • Use truncation to search both challenge and challenges.
  • Search for your keywords in the abstract (use the pull down menu on the right).
  • If your goal is to review past research, do not limit to full text.
  • You may want to limit to References Available or Peer Reviewed

Getting full text:  

When you search PsycINFO and find an article you want to read, you will most often see the “Check for full text” link rather than the “PDF Full Text” link.

checkforfulltext

 

PsycINFO primarily searches citations, not full-text content, so it’s searching much more content than we subscribe to. Click on the “Check for full text” link, and you will be given the option to request a copy of that article from Interlibrary Loan (ILL). ILL articles are delivered via email in 1-4 days, so you do need to plan ahead.

interlibraryloan

 

 


 Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection

The Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection includes full-text content from almost 400 psychology journals. It does include some content from popular publications as well, so when you search in here for your articles for this assignment, go ahead and check the “Peer Reviewed” check box under “Limit To” on the left side of the screen after performing your initial search.

Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection is also an Ebsco database…so this search form will look familiar:

PsychInfo

Although there is more full-text available through the Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, you may still see the “Check for full text” link. You can also request articles from here through Interlibrary Loan.


Searching More Than One Ebsco Database at a Time:

Note that because both of these are Ebsco databases, you can actually search both at the same time. Look for the “choose databases” link:

choosedatabases

choosedatabases2

 

 

 

 

 

Then choose the databases you wish to search within the EBSCO collection of databases:

 

 

 

 


 

More About Searching:

Want to explore more about searching? Click here to find more search hints:http://www.cocc.edu/library/help/tutorials/psy-201_215_spring2014/smart-searching-tips/

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Psych 204 Research Methods, Design and Analysis

TOPIC REVIEW:
Compare and contrast different research methodologies to answer the question:

“What is the value of life”?

Learn how to access different methodologies including surveys, case studies, empirical research, correlational studies, etc.

GETTING STARTED WITH BASIC SEARCHING:

Psychology Databases:

First, let’s use some search tools that are specifically for research in psychology.

Click on the “Articles & More” icon on the Library website’s home page…

library-icon-articles

and then scroll down the alphabetical list until you see “Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection” and “PsycINFO.” These are two search tools that are – as their names suggest – specifically for searching academic literature in the psychology fields.   You can access these search tools off-campus by entering your last name and COCC ID#.


psychdatabases

 


Searching more than one Ebsco database at a time:

Note that because both of these are Ebsco databases, you can actually search both at the same time. Look for the “choose databases” link:

choosedatabases

choosedatabases2

 

 

 

 

 

Then choose the databases you wish to search within the EBSCO collection of databases:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Limiting to Type of Methodology:

Choose your database “Psych Info”.

Scroll down under Limit Your Results, and look for the pull down menu for Methodology.

methodology

 

 

Pull down the file, and choose clinical case study, empirical study, field study, etc.


Some Key Search Points for These Databases:

  • Use “ “ around the phrase “value of life”.
  • Use truncation to search various endings.
  • Search for your keywords in the title of articles (use the pull down menu on the right).
  • If your goal is to review past research, do not limit to full text.
  • Many items in PsychInfo may be citation/abstract only–do you have time to use InterLibrary Loan?  (It’s easy and articles can get to you within one to three days!)

Statistics and Polls:

Barber Library has a webpage just for statistics and polls!  


 

Interlibrary Loan:

https://access.library.oregonstate.edu/CEO/
It’s easy and articles can get to you within one to three days!

 


Review:

Putting it all together–researching by methodology. 

 


Get Hold of Cat:

http://www.cocc.edu/cfinney/

 


 

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HHP 242 Stress Management DEMO

ASSIGNMENT BACKGROUND

Create a macro-level analysis of the Social Stressors of race, culture, gender, poverty, disaster and Systems & Policy level coping strategies.

Each team will:

1) select a Social Stressor

2) search the peer-reviewed and reputable ‘grey’ literature on the macro-level stressor & coping strategies and prepare an annotated bibliography of at least 10 appropriate publications.

3) select an interesting educational resource to share in class and create & facilitate a class activity (45-60 minutes long) that meets well-defined learning objectives,

4) compose a 1-2 page Team Reflection and write a Final Paper.

COURSE RESOURCES FOR SELECTING STRESSORS

Select ONE stressor:  1) Race – see Unnatural Causes, Episodes 2 & 3, 2) Culture – see Unnatural Causes Episodes 3 & 4, 3) Gender – TBD, 4) Natural Disaster or Complex Emergency; the 9/11/2001 terrorist attacks on the United States – TBD, 5) Poverty – See Unnatural Causes Episodes 2 & 7 and Richard Wilkinson’s The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger

USING ARTICLE DATABASES TO LOCATE PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Definition of “Peer Reviewed”:
A board of professional researchers or scholars connected to a journal review (or evaluate) submitted articles before before they are published–assessing each article’s research methods, sources and quality.

Locate articles covering your stressors and/or coping strategies by using our article databases.  Look for the magnifying glass icon “articles and more” on the Barber Library webpage OR go directly to these links:

Specific Search Strategies for Databases:

  • Try typing in keywords (use truncation command *to serve as a wild card for plurals and various endings.
  • Try limiting your search to keywords in article titles (use the pull down menu and select titles).
  • Try limiting your search to full text and/or peer reviewed (scholarly, academic) articles.
  • Try using ” ” for phrases (example:  “coping strategy”).

SEARCHING GREY LITERATURE AND WEB RESOURCES:

Definition of “grey literature”:
“Grey literature is authoritative and reputable sources not produced by book or journal publishers.  Grey literature can be print or web-based, and is generated by federal, state and local governments, academic institutions, businesses and industry.  Grey literature includes: government publications, reports, statistics, newsletters, fact sheets, conference proceedings, technical reports, etc.”

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES:
Many, many streaming video clips, images and other educational resources are available at Barber Library’s Images, Films, and Audio Resources webpage.

Take another look at:  www.unnaturalcauses.org, as well.

CREATING A BIBLIOGRAPHY
Definition:  “A bibliography or reading list is a collection of resources–these can be websites, articles, books, agencies, etc.  Most bibliographies are presented with a particular citation format–that means you list the author, title, publisher or source information, date, and if applicable, web address, in a certain order.  The citation format for this course is APA–American Psychological Association.”  

Citation Format:
Citation Format–APA

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Look for our Need Help?  Just Ask!  icon on the Barber Library Webpage!

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HHP 100 Introduction to Public Health (DEMO)

ASSIGNMENT BACKGROUND

Student teams of 4 will select a STATE from the short list provided by the instructor.

Each team will carry out STATE specific research on racial & ethnic health disparities and poverty (including the multiple ‘faces’ of poverty such as race, ethnicity, gender, age, education, employment status, zip code) in order to create a STATE profile BEFORE-ACA (Affordable Care Act), a POST-ACA profile and to formulate a prediction of what the STATE profile might look like in 20 years (by the year 2035).

This exercise requires students to search how many formerly uninsured folks (and their demographic characteristics) have signed up for health insurance via the health insurance exchanges, for example. In order to carry out this assignment well, the student teams will briefly describe and analyze the STATE health care system, key health policies and viable community health initiatives.

States you can choose for this assignment: AZ, OR, WA, MA, SC, CA, TX, MN, WV, MD, ND, MT, NM.

Each team will prepare a 2-page Executive Summary & Bibliography, a 15 minute presentation (12 ppts slides with references and a 2-page Health Equity Policy for their STATE.

SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ON STATES

Web Resources:

Database Resources for Locating Articles on States:

Locate articles covering your state and health data using our article databases.  Look for the magnifying glass icon “articles and more” on the Barber Library webpage OR go directly to these links:

Specific Search Strategies for Databases:

  • Try typing in keywords (use truncation command *to serve as a wild card for plurals and various endings.
  • Try limiting your search to keywords in article titles (use the pull down menu).
  • Try limiting your search to full text and/or peer reviewed (scholarly, academic) articles.
  • Try using ” ” for phrases (example:  “health equity”).

Demographic Sources and Statistics Resources:

CREATING A BIBLIOGRAPHY

“A bibliography or reading list is a collection of resources–these can be websites, articles, books, agencies, etc.  Most bibliographies are presented with a particular citation format–that means you list the author, title, publisher or source information, date, and if applicable, web address, in a certain order.  

Bibliography Example (APA citation format):
Bibliography Example

Citation Format:
Citation Format–APA
Citation Format–Exercise Science Citation Style

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Look for our Need Help?  Just Ask!  icon on the Barber Library Webpage!

 

 

 

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HHP 258 Holistic Wellness (HANDS ON)

ASSIGNMENT BACKGROUND:
By week two, students will select the following:

  • A ‘setting’ (e.g. a primary school, a community college, a health department, a private worksite, an assisted living residence, etc.).
  • A wellness priority (e.g. childhood obesity, depression among youth or women, eating disorders (bulimia, anorexia), an alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs addition, fall hazards among the elderly, etc.).
  • An appropriate change theory (e.g. Theory of Reasoned Action, Stages of Change Theory, Social Learning Theory, Organizational Change Theory, Socio-ecological Change Theory, etc.).
  • Identify relevant dimensions of wellness (e.g. emotional, spiritual, physical, environmental (including career) and social).
  • AND choose at least one holistic health modality (e.g. acupuncture, naturopathy, mind/body, chiropractic, osteopathy, etc.) that can be applied in the setting.

By the end of the term, each team will:

    1. Search the peer review literature, select a publication that applies the chosen change theory and write a one page reading brief.
    2. Create a short local resource directory/bibliography about the specific “setting, “change theory” and “wellness strategies”.

VERY IMPORTANT:  See your course syllabus and other course hand outs  for information on additional assignments due at the end of the term.


LOCATING PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES IN SELECTED JOURNALS:

Search the peer-reviewed literature and select a publication that applies the chosen change theory & write a 1-page Reading Brief.

Definition of “Peer Reviewed”:
A board of professional researchers or scholars connected to a journal review (or evaluate) submitted articles before before they are published–assessing each article’s research methods, sources and quality.

A Few Particularly Relevant Peer Reviewed Journals at COCC’s Barber Library:

• Health Promotion Practice–now available ONLINE at http://hpp.sagepub.com/.  Soon to also be available in print at Barber Library’s journal browsing area. You can search for articles by topic in this journal by using Academic Search Premier.

• American Journal of Public Health–available ONLINE via our article database Academic Search Premier.

• Holistic Health News–available ONLINE via our article database Alt Health Watch and on the free web at: http://www.hhnews.com/

Finding Articles (in Particular Journals) Using Databases:

Go to the Barber Library webpage and click on our Articles and More icon. Look for Academic Search Premier.

Pull down the Select a Field menu and choose SO Journal Name.

Type in your journal name (I recommend using Health Promotion Practice or American Journal of Public Health).

Type in keywords corresponding to your setting, wellness priority, etc.
​​
To access articles in a wide variety of journals:

• Try our vast selection of health related databases at our Health Sciences Resources webpage.

• Also take a look at our psychological, educational and other social sciences databases at our Social Sciences Resources page .

Specific Search Strategies for Databases:
• Try typing in keywords (use truncation command *to serve as a wild card for plurals and various endings.
• Try limiting your search to keywords in article titles (use the pull down menu).
• Try limiting your search to full text and/or peer reviewed (scholarly, academic) articles.
• Try using ” ” for phrases (example: “change theory”).


SEARCHING GREY LITERATURE AND WEB RESOURCES:

Definition of “grey literature”:
“Grey literature is authoritative and reputable sources not produced by book or journal publishers.  Grey literature can be print or web-based, and is generated by federal, state and local governments, academic institutions, businesses and industry.  Grey literature includes: government publications, reports, statistics, newsletters, fact sheets, conference proceedings, technical reports, etc.”

Grey Literature Websites for This Class:


CREATING A LOCAL RESOURCE DIRECTORY AND/OR BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Exploring local resources:

Creating a reading list or bibliography using citations:
Definition:  “A bibliography or reading list is a collection of resources–these can be websites, articles, books, agencies, etc.  Most bibliographies are presented with a particular citation format–that means you list the author, title, publisher or source information, date, and if applicable, web address, in a certain order.  The citation format for this course is APA–American Psychological Association.”  

Citation Format:
Citation Format–APA

Searching Online Catalogs for Books:
Go to the Barber Library Webpage and look for the Books, Movies and More icon to locate books.

Go to the Deschutes Public Library  to locate books on popular or consumer oriented topics.


 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Look for our Need Help?  Just Ask!  icon on the Barber Library Webpage!

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