HHP 100 Introduction to Public Health (DEMO)

ASSIGNMENT BACKGROUND

Student teams of 4 will select a STATE from the short list provided by the instructor.

Each team will carry out STATE specific research on racial & ethnic health disparities and poverty (including the multiple ‘faces’ of poverty such as race, ethnicity, gender, age, education, employment status, zip code) in order to create a STATE profile BEFORE-ACA (Affordable Care Act), a POST-ACA profile and to formulate a prediction of what the STATE profile might look like in 20 years (by the year 2035).

This exercise requires students to search how many formerly uninsured folks (and their demographic characteristics) have signed up for health insurance via the health insurance exchanges, for example. In order to carry out this assignment well, the student teams will briefly describe and analyze the STATE health care system, key health policies and viable community health initiatives.

States you can choose for this assignment: AZ, OR, WA, MA, SC, CA, TX, MN, WV, MD, ND, MT, NM.

Each team will prepare a 2-page Executive Summary & Bibliography, a 15 minute presentation (12 ppts slides with references and a 2-page Health Equity Policy for their STATE.

SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ON STATES

Web Resources:

Database Resources for Locating Articles on States:

Locate articles covering your state and health data using our article databases.  Look for the magnifying glass icon “articles and more” on the Barber Library webpage OR go directly to these links:

Try our vast selection of health related databases at our  Health Sciences Resources webpage.

Also take a look at our psychological, educational and other social sciences databases at our Social Sciences Resources page .

Specific Search Strategies for Databases:

  • Try typing in keywords (use truncation command *to serve as a wild card for plurals and various endings.
  • Try limiting your search to keywords in article titles (use the pull down menu).
  • Try limiting your search to full text and/or peer reviewed (scholarly, academic) articles.
  • Try using ” ” for phrases (example:  “health equity”).

Demographic Sources and Statistics Resources:

CREATING A BIBLIOGRAPHY

“A bibliography or reading list is a collection of resources–these can be websites, articles, books, agencies, etc.  Most bibliographies are presented with a particular citation format–that means you list the author, title, publisher or source information, date, and if applicable, web address, in a certain order.  

Bibliography Example (APA citation format):
Bibliography Example

Citation Format:
Citation Format–APA
Citation Format–Exercise Science Citation Style

 

 

 

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HHP 258 Holistic Wellness

ASSIGNMENT BACKGROUND
Select  the following:

  • A ‘setting’ (e.g. a primary school, a community college, a health department, a private worksite, an assisted living residence, etc.).
  • A wellness priority (e.g. childhood obesity, depression among youth or women, eating disorders (bulimia, anorexia), an alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs addition, fall hazards among the elderly, etc.).
  • An appropriate change theory (e.g. Theory of Reasoned Action, Stages of Change Theory, Social Learning Theory, Organizational Change Theory, Socio-ecological Change Theory, etc.).
  • Identify relevant dimensions of wellness (e.g. emotional, spiritual, physical, environmental (including career) and social).
  • AND choose at least one holistic health modality (e.g. acupuncture, naturopathy, mind/body, chiropractic, osteopathy, etc.) which you will research as a group.

By the end of the term, each team will:

    1. Search the peer review literature, select a publication that applies the chosen change theory and write a one page reading brief.
    2. Create a short local resource directory/bibliography about the specific “setting, “change theory” and “wellness strategies”.

VERY IMPORTANT:  See your course syllabus and other course hand outs  for information on additional assignments due at the end of the term.


USING DATABASES TO SEARCH FOR PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES

Search the peer-reviewed literature and select a publication that applies the chosen change theory & write a 1-page Reading Brief.

Definition of “Peer Reviewed”:
A board of professional researchers or scholars connected to a journal review (or evaluate) submitted articles before before they are published–assessing each article’s research methods, sources and quality.

A Few Particularly Relevant Peer Reviewed Journals at COCC’s Barber Library:

  • Health Promotion Practice
  • American Journal of Public Health
  • Holistic Health

Locate these on our browsing shelves (main floor of the library) and via our article databases.

Finding Articles in Our Databases:
Locate articles covering your settings, wellness priorities, etc. by using our article databases.  Look for the magnifying glass icon “articles and more” on the Barber Library webpage OR go directly to these links:

Try our vast selection of health related databases at our  Health Sciences Resources webpage.

Also take a look at our psychological, educational and other social sciences databases at our Social Sciences Resources page .

Specific Search Strategies for Databases:

  • Try typing in keywords (use truncation command *to serve as a wild card for plurals and various endings.
  • Try limiting your search to keywords in article titles (use the pull down menu).
  • Try limiting your search to full text and/or peer reviewed (scholarly, academic) articles.

Try using ” ” for phrases (example:  “change theory”).


SEARCHING GREY LITERATURE AND WEB RESOURCES

Definition of “grey literature”:
“Grey literature is authoritative and reputable sources not produced by book or journal publishers.  Grey literature can be print or web-based, and is generated by federal, state and local governments, academic institutions, businesses and industry.  Grey literature includes: government publications, reports, statistics, newsletters, fact sheets, conference proceedings, technical reports, etc.”

Grey Literature Websites for This Class:


CREATING A LOCAL RESOURCE DIRECTORY AND/OR BIBLIOGRAPHY

Exploring local resources:

Creating a reading list or bibliography using citations:
Definition:  “A bibliography or reading list is a collection of resources–these can be websites, articles, books, agencies, etc.  Most bibliographies are presented with a particular citation format–that means you list the author, title, publisher or source information, date, and if applicable, web address, in a certain order.  The citation format for this course is APA–American Psychological Association.”   Citation Format–APA

Searching Online Catalogs for Books:
Go to the Barber Library Webpage and look for the Books, Movies and More icon to locate books.

Go to the Deschutes Public Library  to locate books on popular or consumer oriented topics.


 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Look for our Need Help?  Just Ask!  icon on the Barber Library Webpage!

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Cultural Anthropology

LOCATING RESOURCES FOR ANTHROPOLOGY:

To find academic and non-academic resources,  start at the Barber Library Web page at http://www.cocc.edu/library/.

Look for the icon that says Resources by Subject.
Find Resources by Subject

Scroll down, and look for the link that leads you to the Social Sciences page.

That leads you to a great webpage that has links to our online catalog (to find books) and many, many links to our online databases (to find articles) in the field of anthropology.  Topics for your Cultural Anthropology  midterm research assignment are best addressed using our article databases.

Since you are researching products for this course, you’ll find some great resources on our Business page as well.

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USE THESE DATABASES TO FIND ARTICLES:

The article databases Academic Search Premier or Academic OneFile are great places to start for academic articles.  Also try  Business Resource Premier and Business, Economics and Theory for a business/economic perspective on your product.

MasterFile Premier and Popular Magazines are great places to start for non-academic articles.

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SEARCH TECHNIQUES:

  • Try typing in keywords (use truncation–the *–to serve as a wild card for plurals and various endings.
  • Try limiting your search to keywords in article titles (use the pull down menu).
  • Try limiting your search to full text and/or peer reviewed (scholarly, academic) articles.
  • Try using ” ” for phrases (example:  “fair trade”).
  • Try using some of the cultural anthropology concepts and phrases discussed in your midterm project  description:  globalization, capitalism, “fair trade”, enculturation, “cultural relativism”.

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HOW TO DETERMINE WHETHER A SOURCE IS ACADEMIC OR NOT ACADEMIC:
Academic books and articles will be supported with footnotes/endnotes and bibliographies.  Look at the back of the book or scroll down to the end of an article to find these.  Other signs of an academic source are the publisher (is it a university press?) or the title or credentials of the journal.  Most of our article databases allow you to limit your search to scholarly (academic) resources.  Academic sources tend to dive deep into a topic.  The article databases Academic Search Premier or Academic OneFile are great places to start for academic articles.

Non-academic (or popular) sources may be brief, involve more illustrations, be printed on glossy paper, and perhaps provide a ‘light’ or subjective take on a topic.
Several of our article databases–MasterFile Premier and Popular Magazines--focus on non academic articles.

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AAA CITATION FORMAT:

Printable Quick Guide: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

Style: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

Citations: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

Bibliography: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

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Psy 213 Introduction to Physiological Psychology

 Research for Psychology Lab Reports

For this class, you will need to find literature (ie. articles) to justify your hypotheses and to discuss what is already known about how cognitive challenges affect physiology.


Psychology Databases:

First, let’s use some search tools that are specifically for research in psychology.

Click on the “Articles & More” icon on the Library website’s home page…

library-icon-articles

and then scroll down the alphabetical list until you see “Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection” and “PsycINFO.” These are two search tools that are – as their names suggest – specifically for searching academic literature in the psychology fields.   You can access these search tools off-campus by entering your last name and COCC ID#.


psychdatabases

 

 

 

 

 


Writing Psych Reports:

Now, before you jump in, let’s review some fundamentals about researching and writing lab reports.

Many psychology lab reports require a particular format. Here’s a few examples of guidelines:


Searching Psych Databases:

On to searching…starting with PsycINFO!

PsycINFO

PsycINFO lets you search over 3 million citations for scholarly journal articles, book chapters, books, and dissertations in the field of psychology. The interface will look similar to Academic Search Premier. Take a look:

PsychInfo

 

 

 

 

 

Some key search points for this topic:

  • Use “ “ around the phrase “heart rate”.
  • Use truncation to search both challenge and challenges.
  • Search for your keywords in the abstract (use the pull down menu on the right).
  • If your goal is to review past research, do not limit to full text.
  • You may want to limit to References Available or Peer Reviewed

Getting full text:  

When you search PsycINFO and find an article you want to read, you will most often see the “Check for full text” link rather than the “PDF Full Text” link.

checkforfulltext

 

 

 

 

PsycINFO primarily searches citations, not full-text content, so it’s searching much more content than we subscribe to. Click on the “Check for full text” link, and you will be given the option to request a copy of that article from Interlibrary Loan (ILL). ILL articles are delivered via email in 1-4 days, so you do need to plan ahead.

interlibraryloan

 


Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection

The Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection includes full-text content from almost 400 psychology journals. It does include some content from popular publications as well, so when you search in here for your articles for this assignment, go ahead and check the “Peer Reviewed” check box under “Limit To” on the left side of the screen after performing your initial search.

Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection is also an Ebsco database…so this search form will look familiar:

PsychInfo

 

 

 

 

 

Although there is more full-text available through the Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, you may still see the “Check for full text” link. You can also request articles from here through Interlibrary Loan.


Searching more than one Ebsco database at a time:

Note that because both of these are Ebsco databases, you can actually search both at the same time. Look for the “choose databases” link:

choosedatabases

choosedatabases2

 

 

 

 

 

Then choose the databases you wish to search within the EBSCO collection of databases:

 

 

 


 More About Searching:

Want to explore more about searching? Click here to find more search hints: http://www.cocc.edu/library/help/tutorials/psy-201_215_spring2014/smart-searching-tips/

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English 253: Survey of American Literature

Potential research sources for your culture presentations
by Annemarie Hamlin

ENG 253: Survey of American Literature

(Note: if links in this document do not work for you, access the library directly and look for these titles or copy and paste the URL you are interested in.)

Remote Access:  When accessing some links from off campus you be presented with a brief form that asks you to provide your last name and COCC student ID number.

________________________________________

 Barber Library: http://www.cocc.edu/library/

________________________________________

 Online encyclopedias (listed in the history and humanities subject pages): http://www.cocc.edu/library/academicencyclopedias/

The collection off specialized encyclopedias will offer detailed introductions to many different cultural topics. Look in the encyclopedias in the History and Humanities sections, and notice how specialized some of them get. Find a title that might encompass your chosen subject and begin searching. Here are just a few that might relate to the periods we are studying in ENG 253.

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Online databases:

Databases are collections of articles from scholarly and popular publications. Academic Search Premier is good for both history and literature, but some others you might consider are listed below.

History: http://www.cocc.edu/library/history/

Humanities: http://www.cocc.edu/library/humanities/

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 Print sources:

Reference–find these in the reference collection on the Barber Library main floor.

  • Encyclopedia of the North American colonies   REFE45 .E53 1993
  • Historical statistics of the United States, colonial times to 1970.  REF HA202 .B87 1975

Books–find these on the  Barber Library second floor.

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Video and image collections:
http://www.cocc.edu/library/multimedia/

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Open Internet sources:

Many good sources exist on the open web for researchers in history and literature, but be choosy about what you find. Look for sources from highly reliable organizations (universities,  government, and many museum sources are a good place to start). Try some of these favorites below and please bring your great finds to the class to share.

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Anthropology 103 Research

LOCATING RESOURCES FOR ANTHROPOLOGY:

To find academic and non-academic resources on “racism and america” start at the Barber Library Web page at http://www.cocc.edu/library/.

Look for the icon that says Resources by Subject.
Find Resources by Subject

Scroll down, and look for the link that leads you to the Social Sciences page.

That leads you to a great webpage that has links to our online catalog (to find books) and many, many links to our online databases (to find articles) in the field of anthropology.  Scroll down a bit and you will find links to our online encyclopedias, as well.  Most of these resources lead you to academic sources.

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HOW TO DETERMINE WHETHER A SOURCE IS ACADEMIC OR NOT ACADEMIC:
Academic books and articles will be supported with footnotes/endnotes and bibliographies.  Look at the back of the book or scroll down to the end of an article to find these.  Other signs of an academic source are the publisher (is it a university press?) or the title or credentials of the journal.  Most of our article databases allow you to limit your search to scholarly (academic) resources.  Academic sources tend to dive deep into a topic.  The article databases Academic Search Premier or Academic OneFile are great places to start for academic articles.

Non-academic (or popular) sources may be brief, involve more illustrations, be printed on glossy paper, and perhaps provide a ‘light’ or subjective take on a topic.
Several of our article databases–MasterFile Premier and Popular Magazines--focus on non academic articles.

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FINDING BOOKS:
Start with the Social Sciences Resource page and click on the link for Barber Library Catalog.

Choose a keyword search.  Type in the keywords america  racism.

If you want to try truncation (using a wildcard chacter) do this:  america*  rac*

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FINDING ARTICLES:
Again, the article databases Academic Search Premier or Academic OneFile are great places to start for academic articles, and….

MasterFile Premier and Popular Magazines are great places to start for non-academic articles.

Try typing in keywords (use truncation!).

Try limiting your search to keywords in article titles (use the pull down menu).

Try limiting your search to full text and/or peer reviewed (scholarly, academic) articles.

______________________________________________

AAA CITATION FORMAT:

Printable Quick Guide: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

Style: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

Citations: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

Bibliography: http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

______________________________________________

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Research for Outdoor Leadership

http://researchhappy.wordpress.com/2013/05/02/outdoor-leadership/

First, you are going to want to get to know the Campus Library Webpage at http://www.cocc.edu/Library so that you can find books, background information and articles!

Why use a library webpage for accessing information when you can just use Google, you ask?

WELL!  Think of the library as your map to the world of information.  You can wander around the free web (Google, etc) and stumble across factual, accurate information just like you can wander around Europe and stumble upon the Eifel tower (eventually!).  There’s a lot of great stuff that can be found by wandering, but if you want efficient, effective access to information, library search tools help you get there fast.

Furthermore, have you ever felt like you needed a credit card available to access the good stuff on the web?  Doesn’t that feel a little stressful?

Libraries buy the good stuff for you.  That’s what we’re all about–giving you access to good, valuable, scholarly information.  The thing is, you have to know how to use library search tools in order to find the good stuff.  It’s not harder than Google–it’s just a little more spread out–you use different library search tools to locate different kinds of information, such as books, articles, and facts.


To Get Some Articles, Use Journal Article Databases:

Remember to start at the Campus Library webpage at: http://www.cocc.edu/Library/.

Look for the Articles and More icon to access journal article databases.  Journal article databases let you search on your topic to locate academic, scholarly articles.  The library purchases these databases for you to search–this is different from searching on Google or other “free web” search engines!

Take a look at the Resources by Subject icon as well–it will list all databases and online encyclopedias for specific subject areas!

Some database highlights from the Resources by Subject page for Outdoor Leadership–these will help you locate articles on Outdoor Leadership topics.

Academic One File
Academic Search Premier
Global Road Warrior
Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure Collection
National Geographic Magazine, 1888-present
Oregon Topographic Maps
Statistical Abstract of the United States

A few additional databases covering business and news:

Associates Programs Source Plus
Business & Company Resource Center
America’s News
Bend Bulletin

 TO SEARCH A JOURNAL ARTICLE DATABASE:

Journal Article Database Search Hints

  • start with keyword searching when available

  • use ” ” for phrases
    example: “outdoor recreation” and “program accreditation”

  • use * to locate endings to words (truncation).
    example: adolescen*

  • use boolean commands
    example: learn* and style*
    example: learn* and (style* or pref*)

  • searches can be specific

  • full text articles may be e-mailed, downloaded or printed from the screen.

  • other articles may be located from the COCC Library e-journals link or may be ordered via inter-library loan.


SURVEY MONKEY

http://www.surveymonkey.com/

This incredible (free!) survey tool allows you to create surveys on topics of your choice.


BACKGROUND INFORMATION–USING ONLINE ENCYCLOPEDIAS:

Sometimes you just can’t search a journal article database successfully until you know at least some of the basic background (and language) for your topic.  To locate background information, try the online encyclopedia collections  listed below.  You can use these links or get to all of these from the COCC Library webpage. Look for the Encyclopedias and more link (you’ll see the globe icon) and then click on Encyclopedias.  Here’s some direct links to some of our more comprehensive resources:

Credo Reference Online

Gale Reference Online

Oxford Reference Online

Some specific online encyclopedias that are useful for topics in Outdoor Leadership are:

Encyclopedia of Recreation and Leisure in America
Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
The Gale Encyclopedia of Fitness
Oregon Encyclopedia
U.S. Land and National Resources Policy: History, Debates, State Data, Maps, Primary Documents
World of Sports Science


MORE HELP

Oh, and don’t forget!   You can always stop by or call the Barber Library Information Deskref….or use our 24/7 chat service!

 

 

 

 

 

 


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